Aankondiging

Samenvouwen
Nog geen aankondiging momenteel

HOT! Weer een manier om aard achtige planeten te ontdekken!

Samenvouwen
Dit onderwerp is gesloten.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Tijd
  • Toon
Alles wissen
nieuwe berichten

    HOT! Weer een manier om aard achtige planeten te ontdekken!

    Weer een manier om aard achtige planeten te ontdekken!

    Net nog het bericht op de homepage over het koppelen van kleine telescopen in de ruimte om 1 grote telescoop te vormen, en nu alweer een nieuwe bericht van een wetenschapper die denkt DE manier te hebben gevonden voor het ontdekken van planeten zoals onze mooie moeder aarde..

    July 5th, 2006

    Space telescopes designed to observe distant planets need to be powerful, but they also need some method of blocking the light from the parent star, which completely washes out any dimmer objects orbiting it. A strategy from CU-Boulder professor Webster Cash would use a large, daisy-shaped space shield to block the light from the star. A space telescope trailing the shade by thousands of kilometres would then be able to see much fainter objects surrounding the star.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    New Worlds Imager. Image credit: CU-Boulder
    Click to enlarge
    A gigantic, daisy-shaped space shield could be used to block out pesky starlight and allow astronomers using an orbiting telescope to zero in on Earth-like planets in other solar systems, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder study.

    The thin plastic “starshade” would allow a telescope trailing thousands of miles behind it to image light from distant planets skimming by the giant petals without being swamped by light from the parent stars, said CU-Boulder Professor Webster Cash. Researchers could then identify planetary features like oceans, continents, polar caps and cloud banks and even detect biomarkers like methane, oxygen and water if they exist, he said.

    “We think this is a compelling concept, particularly because it can be built today with existing technology,” said Cash. “We will be able to study Earth-like planets tens of trillions of miles away and chemically analyze their atmospheres for signs of life.”

    A paper on the subject by Cash is featured on the cover of the July 6 issue of Nature. The paper includes mathematical solutions to optical challenges like the bending and scattering of light between the pliable, 50-yard-in-diameter starshade and the space telescope, which would orbit in tandem roughly 15,000 miles apart.

    Scientists would launch the telescope and starshade together into an orbit roughly 1 million miles from Earth, then remotely unfurl the starshade and use small thrusters to move it into lines of sight of nearby stars thought to harbor planets, said Cash. The thrusters would be intermittently turned on to hold the starshade steady during the observations of the planets, which would appear as bright specks.

    “Think of an outfielder holding up one hand to block out the sunlight as he tracks a fly ball,” said Cash, director of CU-Boulder’s Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy. “We would use the starshade as a giant hand to suppress the light emanating from a central star by a factor of about 10 billion.”

    The novel concept could be used to map planetary systems around distant stars and detect planets as small as Earth’s moon, said Cash. In recent years, more than 175 planets have been discovered orbiting other stars.

    Dubbed the New Worlds Observer, Cash’s design was selected for a $400,000 funding boost last October by NASA’s Institute for Advanced Concepts after being selected for initial study in 2004. The team includes researchers from Princeton University, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Ball Aerospace of Boulder, Northrop Grumman Corp. of Los Angeles and the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C.

    The team also has submitted a $400 million proposal with NASA’s Discovery Program to launch a stand-alone starshade to work in concert with the powerful James Webb Space Telescope. The James Webb Space Telescope is an infrared observatory slated for launch in 2013 and considered the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Alternative proposals for imaging distant planets involve suppressing parent starlight once it has entered the telescope — a complicated, Rube Goldberg-like undertaking involving shifting mirrors and active electronics, said Marc Kuchner of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory. “In contrast, this is a very clean and simple optical concept, and may be the most promising idea yet on how to directly image our Earth-like neighbors,” said Kuchner, also a member of the New Worlds Observer science team.

    “For over a century, science fiction writers have speculated on the existence of Earth-like planets around nearby stars,” Cash wrote in Nature. “If they actually exist, use of an occulter could find them within the next decade.”

    An even more advanced version of the New Worlds Imager might involve a ring of telescopes placed on the moon beneath a fleet of orbiting starshades that would allow scientists to actually photograph distant, Earth-like planets, Cash speculated. “There is a bit of Buck Rogers in the New Worlds Imager concept, but seeking and mapping new lands is something that seems to ring deep in the human psyche.”
    De kosmos, wat een geniaal ontwerp.....

    #2
    Re: HOT! Weer een manier om aard achtige planeten te ontdekk

    Origineel geplaatst door gijsraaf
    Weer een manier om aard achtige planeten te ontdekken!

    Net nog het bericht op de homepage over het koppelen van kleine telescopen in de ruimte om 1 grote telescoop te vormen, en nu alweer een nieuwe bericht van een wetenschapper die denkt DE manier te hebben gevonden voor het ontdekken van planeten zoals onze mooie moeder aarde..

    July 5th, 2006

    Space telescopes designed to observe distant planets need to be powerful, but they also need some method of blocking the light from the parent star, which completely washes out any dimmer objects orbiting it. A strategy from CU-Boulder professor Webster Cash would use a large, daisy-shaped space shield to block the light from the star. A space telescope trailing the shade by thousands of kilometres would then be able to see much fainter objects surrounding the star.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    New Worlds Imager. Image credit: CU-Boulder
    Click to enlarge
    A gigantic, daisy-shaped space shield could be used to block out pesky starlight and allow astronomers using an orbiting telescope to zero in on Earth-like planets in other solar systems, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder study.

    The thin plastic “starshade” would allow a telescope trailing thousands of miles behind it to image light from distant planets skimming by the giant petals without being swamped by light from the parent stars, said CU-Boulder Professor Webster Cash. Researchers could then identify planetary features like oceans, continents, polar caps and cloud banks and even detect biomarkers like methane, oxygen and water if they exist, he said.

    “We think this is a compelling concept, particularly because it can be built today with existing technology,” said Cash. “We will be able to study Earth-like planets tens of trillions of miles away and chemically analyze their atmospheres for signs of life.”

    A paper on the subject by Cash is featured on the cover of the July 6 issue of Nature. The paper includes mathematical solutions to optical challenges like the bending and scattering of light between the pliable, 50-yard-in-diameter starshade and the space telescope, which would orbit in tandem roughly 15,000 miles apart.

    Scientists would launch the telescope and starshade together into an orbit roughly 1 million miles from Earth, then remotely unfurl the starshade and use small thrusters to move it into lines of sight of nearby stars thought to harbor planets, said Cash. The thrusters would be intermittently turned on to hold the starshade steady during the observations of the planets, which would appear as bright specks.

    “Think of an outfielder holding up one hand to block out the sunlight as he tracks a fly ball,” said Cash, director of CU-Boulder’s Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy. “We would use the starshade as a giant hand to suppress the light emanating from a central star by a factor of about 10 billion.”

    The novel concept could be used to map planetary systems around distant stars and detect planets as small as Earth’s moon, said Cash. In recent years, more than 175 planets have been discovered orbiting other stars.

    Dubbed the New Worlds Observer, Cash’s design was selected for a $400,000 funding boost last October by NASA’s Institute for Advanced Concepts after being selected for initial study in 2004. The team includes researchers from Princeton University, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Ball Aerospace of Boulder, Northrop Grumman Corp. of Los Angeles and the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C.

    The team also has submitted a $400 million proposal with NASA’s Discovery Program to launch a stand-alone starshade to work in concert with the powerful James Webb Space Telescope. The James Webb Space Telescope is an infrared observatory slated for launch in 2013 and considered the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Alternative proposals for imaging distant planets involve suppressing parent starlight once it has entered the telescope — a complicated, Rube Goldberg-like undertaking involving shifting mirrors and active electronics, said Marc Kuchner of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center’s Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory. “In contrast, this is a very clean and simple optical concept, and may be the most promising idea yet on how to directly image our Earth-like neighbors,” said Kuchner, also a member of the New Worlds Observer science team.

    “For over a century, science fiction writers have speculated on the existence of Earth-like planets around nearby stars,” Cash wrote in Nature. “If they actually exist, use of an occulter could find them within the next decade.”

    An even more advanced version of the New Worlds Imager might involve a ring of telescopes placed on the moon beneath a fleet of orbiting starshades that would allow scientists to actually photograph distant, Earth-like planets, Cash speculated. “There is a bit of Buck Rogers in the New Worlds Imager concept, but seeking and mapping new lands is something that seems to ring deep in the human psyche.”
    De kosmos, wat een geniaal ontwerp.....

    Commentaar


      #3
      Bron aub? Dan kan ik het vertalen.

      Commentaar


        #4
        Overigens vind ik niet echt HOT nieuws. Het is geen nieuwe manier om aardachtige planeten te ontdekken. Momenteel worden er al exoplaneten ontdekt door het licht van sterren te blokkeren. Dan passen ze het alleen toe op aardachtige planeten, maar het trucje blijft gelijk.

        Commentaar


          #5
          Waarom plaats je het twee keer in dit topic, gijs? En ik zou zeggen: vertaal het! Je kunt dat goed, dan heb je er mooi weer een artikel op de frontpage onder jouw naam bij. Dan vind ik het zo onderhand wel tijd worden voor een volledig nieuwsposter-account voor je, of heb je dat al?
          This person attempts not to panic, with the aid of several towels.

          Commentaar


            #6
            Re: HOT! Weer een manier om aard achtige planeten te ontdekk

            Weer een manier om aard achtige planeten te ontdekken!

            Net nog het bericht op de homepage over het koppelen van kleine telescopen in de ruimte om 1 grote telescoop te vormen, en nu alweer een nieuwe bericht van een wetenschapper die denkt DE manier te hebben gevonden voor het ontdekken van planeten zoals onze mooie moeder aarde..

            July 5th, 2006

            De ruimte telescopen die worden ontworpen om verre planeten waar te nemen moeten krachtig zijn, maar zij hebben ook één of andere methode om het licht van de moederster (zon) te blokkeren nodig. Door dat licht is het tot nu toe erg moeilijk om de relatief kleine schemerigere voorwerpen die eromheen cirkelen te ontdekken.

            Een strategie van professor Webster Cash verteld ons dat een groot ruimteschild in de vorm van een madeliefje gebruikt kan worden om het licht van de ster te blokkeren. Een ruimtetelescoop die de schaduw van dit schild volgt op een afstand van duizenden kilometers, zou dan veel vagere voorwerpen kunnen zien die om een ster ster circelen.

            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            ]
            A gigantic, daisy-shaped space shield could be used to block out pesky starlight and allow astronomers using an orbiting telescope to zero in on Earth-like planets in other solar systems, according to a University of Colorado at Boulder study.

            Het dunne plastiek "ruimteschild", wat gevolgd wordt op duizenden km afstand, zou een telescoop in staat stellen om het zwakke licht van verre planeten op te vangen, zonder gestoord te worden door het extreem felle licht van de moederster.
            zegt Cu-Boulder Professor Webster Cash. De onderzoekers kunnen vervolgens planetarische eigenschappen ontdekken, zoals oceanen, continenten, polaire kappen en wolken vorming en zelfs biomarkers zoals methaan, zuurstof en water als die natuurlijk buiten aarde bestaan...

            Een proefschrift over dit onderwerp door professor Cash, wordt behandeld op de cover van "Nature" (de editie die 6 juli uitkomt).
            Het proefschrift omvat ook wiskundige onderbouwingen voor vragen over het in totaal bijna 100 meter (50 yard?) grote flexibele ruimteschild. Deze heeft namelijk wat invloed op het licht de ruimte telescoop probeert op te vangen, aangezien die er bijna 30.000 km achter hangt...

            Als je meer over de technische kant wilt weten, moet je even de bron (engels) aanklikken.

            Deze methode kan het licht met een factor van wel 10 miljard keer af laten nemen.

            In de afgelopen jaren zijn er al meer dan 175 planeten ontdekt, die om een zon circelen, en dat aantal kan met dit soort initiatieven dan ook explosief toe nemen de komende jaren...

            Het ontwerp en het plan van Cash is oktober 2005 geselecteerd als gelukkige en kreeg een financierings verhoging van $400.000. Het bedrag komt van "NASA stitute for Advanced Concepts" welke Cash ook al hadden aangesteld voor de aanvankelijke studie in 2004. Het team omvat onderzoekers van de Universiteit van Princeton, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Ball Aerospace in de plaats Boulder, Northrop Grumman Corp. en de Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C.

            Het team heeft nu de $400 miljoen beschikbaar gesteld om als stand alone missie toch samen te werken met de krachtige James Webb Space Telescope. James Webb Space Telescope is een infrarood waarnemingscentrum welke gepland staat in 2013 en wordt nu al beschouwd als de opvolger van de beroemde Hubble Ruimtetelescoop.

            Professor Cash ziet het al helemaal voor zich, een keten van aan elkaar gekoppelde telescopen, welke gestationeerd zijn op de maan. Door middel van de ruimte schilden die er duizende km vredig bovenhangen, kunnen deze telescopen gedetailleerde foto's maken van aarde achtige planeten.

            Het klinkt misschien wel een beetje Buck Rogers achtig, maar ik zal wel weg zitten kwijlen bij het zien van die foto's
            De kosmos, wat een geniaal ontwerp.....

            Commentaar


              #7
              Origineel geplaatst door DaMatrix
              Waarom plaats je het twee keer in dit topic, gijs? En ik zou zeggen: vertaal het! Je kunt dat goed, dan heb je er mooi weer een artikel op de frontpage onder jouw naam bij. Dan vind ik het zo onderhand wel tijd worden voor een volledig nieuwsposter-account voor je, of heb je dat al?
              Heeft hij al, maar ik plaats het zelf voorlopig handmatig voor hem. 8)

              Commentaar


                #8
                Nu overigens alleen nog een bron, Gijs

                Commentaar


                  #9
                  sorry, meerdere keren het bericht geplaatst...

                  sorry, meerdere keren het bericht geplaatst...
                  De kosmos, wat een geniaal ontwerp.....

                  Commentaar


                    #10
                    Bron: http://www.universetoday.com/2006/07/05 ... l-planets/

                    ************, ja sorry hoor, maar ik kan mijn berichten niet meer aanpassen... er staat alleen nog maar een optie "quote" als ik ingelogd ben.. ik ben geen vrienden met dit systeem.. sorry
                    De kosmos, wat een geniaal ontwerp.....

                    Commentaar

                    Werken...
                    X